How Much Coding Should Designers Know?


Written by Irina Papuc Topics: Learn to Code

Many designers think each discipline should mind their own business, while others see no problem in professionals wearing multiple hats. Many developers see designers who code as a threat, while others see it as a facilitator. This is a hotly debated subject, and although I think some great designers are also superb at coding, I will always defend that the more you focus on a particular area the best you will be at it. But this shouldn’t be a reason for you to miss out on the benefits of having another skill under your belt.

Learn to Code

Learn how to code and make yourself a great asset to any multi-disciplinary team.

As a designer who has gone as far to set up Linux servers and program back-end, I see no question that understanding ‘the basics’ of coding would benefit any designer. The question really is, how much coding should designers learn? At what point might designers be wasting their time, or really stepping over the line into the territory of developers?

In order to provide some insight into the potential benefits of learning to code, I’ve broken the different levels of coding knowledge down into degrees of usefulness.

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Boost Your Productivity With Clever Travel Hardware


Written by Irina Papuc Topics: Self Improvement

Boost Your Productivity

So, you want to boost your productivity? Nevermind Game of Thrones, winter is not coming, at least not in the northern hemisphere. It’s summertime, and here at Toptal that usually means many of our freelance developers and designers are either on the road or getting ready to hit the beach.

When I started writing this, some of our people were in Portugal, trying to work out the math behind surfboards. Now it’s my turn, and I’m wrapping up my draft with a nice view of the Adriatic Sea, just a few miles away from the best windsurfing spot in Europe.

Yes, I’m a workaholic, so this might as well be a good time to cover the topic I had in mind.

I can probably guess what some of you are thinking:

This is a lifestyle post! This guy is going to talk about surfing, healthy food and excercise.

No. This is not a lifestyle post. As far as food goes, fresh fish and veggies are always a safe bet. Exercise? Well, cycling to a nearby village to try a marginally different fish dish and sample local wine counts as exercise, at least to me.

So, with all the lifestyle stuff out of the way, I can get back to my message and start discussing the logistics behind travel and remote work and how you can boost your productivity. You can buy capri pants, cheap flip-flops, and boonie hats everywhere, but beachside shops usually don’t carry quality hardware that can help you be more productive on the road, or save time and money for more enjoyable activities.

Caveat: If you’re an avid Apple user with a profound dislike of Windows, you may not like where I’m going with this. I don’t intend to bash Apple, but Cupertino simply doesn’t bother with cheap hardware that won’t be missed if it ends up in the water.

Travel Hardware: Myths and Moths

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Learn to Code: Toptal’s Quick And Practical JavaScript Cheat Sheet: ES6 And Beyond


Written by Irina Papuc Topics: Learn to Code

JavaScript: What is ES6?

ECMAScript 6 (ES6) is the latest standard specification of JavaScript, the programming language of the Web. Since HTML5 and the birth of Node.js, the runtime that allows us to run JavaScript on the server or desktop, JavaScript has gained a unique momentum. There is a growing adoption rate among enterprises, embracing it into production, and thus its newest features were greatly awaited.

We created this cheat sheet as a list of ES6 features we use everyday. Trying to be comprehensive but concise at the same time, new API methods are left apart. For those who need them, make a quick search by yourself or try to explore the MDN documentation to catch the latest experimental APIs. However, some the most bleeding edge characteristics like async and await from the next specification draft (ES7) are included. This is because of most of us developers are going to use a transpiler like Babel anyway to get advantage of the newest JavaScript.

You can test out some of the mentioned tips by running the node REPL with this command:

node --use-strict $(node --v8-options | grep harm | awk '{print $1}' | xargs) #ES6

Or, use directly a babel-node to get the most of Javascript in your console.

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